Posts

Building inspector training

Extracts only from: Guide to Standards and Tolerances (NSW Office of Fair Trading)


Building inspector trainingExtracts only from: Guide to Standards and Tolerances (NSW Office of Fair Trading, these sections are excerpts only)

Masonry distress (Cracking)

Where distress and rated Category 3 or more (i.e. more than 5 mm; refer AS 2870 – 1996 Residential Slab & Footings Construction)

Masonry facing

Bricks shall generally be laid with true brick face outwards. When bricks in batches are supplied from manufacturers may vary in colour therefore they shall be mixed and or distributed in accordance with manufacturers recommendations.

Damproof courses

To be in accordance with the Part 3.3.4 of the BCA.

Brick sills – shrinking allowance for timber framing

Reference to brick sills includes for sill tiles.

Distortion of window frames and or dislodgment of sill bricks shall be a defect where such distortion and or dislodgement were caused by lack of initial sill brick clearance from the window sill refers to Part 3.3.1 of the BCA.

These clearances must be provided at the time of construction and must not be less than

(i) 5 mm at sills of lower and single storey windows; and

(ii) 8 mm at roof overhangs of single storey buildings; and

(iii) 10 mm at sills of second storey windows; and

(iv) 12 mm at roof overhangs to two storey buildings.

Concrete slab distress

If the distress is rated at less than Category 3, the defect is to be mentioned for a period of twelve months. If at the end of the monitoring period, the distress rating is assessed as greater than

Category 2, this will be considered a defect.

Where a residential slab designed in accordance with AS 2870-1996 or AS3600-2001concrete structures is to act as a termite barrier in accordance with AS3660-200 Termite management, shrinkage cracks through the slab are not to exceed 1.0 mm width.
Extract from AS2870-1996 – Residential slabs and footings – construction

Why Building Inspectors Need Training

The standards for building inspectors have changed over the years and today it has become more important than ever for them to have the right training. In order to be a building inspector in today’s world, you will need the training and understanding of the laws and regulations to do your job properly.

Deregulation of Building Inspectors

The reason why building inspector training is important was because of the 2009 law that quietly deregulated the industry in NSW. The result became people who could call themselves building inspectors who had no training or experience. Property owners all over the country became subject to having inspectors that may not have known much, if anything about their craft.

For inspectors who want to be properly trained, there is now a means to do so that will help restore confidence in the field of inspection. Thanks to organisations like Housesafe, there is now ongoing training for building inspectors that helps them keep up their skills and informs them of new laws and regulations as well.

The Different Aspects of Building Inspector Training

It takes more than just to know what to look for as a building inspector you must be able to comply with the standards of the industry. This means that you will have to be very familiar with the following;

–        Australian Standards for Building Inspectors

–        Spotting Defects

–        Report Writing

–        Contracts & Fee Agreements

–        Working with Clients and More!

The AS 4349 Series is the workbook from which every building inspector should have on them at all times. In order to be a building inspector, you will have to understand the guidelines or face legal penalties for not following all the codes.

Spotting defects is really at the heart of building inspector training. You must be able to detect subtle defects that could mean a real depreciation in the value of the home. Plus, you must understand the difference between actual defects and incomplete work. They must be accurately written in your reports as well.

Proper report writing is another aspect of the ongoing training for building inspectors which helps you understand how to create your reports, file them according to the Australian Standards and put in all evidence, including photos and diagrams so that you can conduct the best possible pre-purchase or construction inspection. If you have staff, they will need to know how to effectively write your reports and proofread before releasing them to the clients.

Arranging fee agreements and contracts with clients is another skill that needs to be developed, especially in following all the procedures. Of course, understanding how to communicate with those who you work for is imperative if you want success as a building inspector. The combination of being professional and approachable can be achieved with the right training.

To be a building inspector is not easy, but it is highly rewarding work if you have the right training. Building inspector training will help you do the best job possible for your clients and grow your business.